Walkie Talkies

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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby hvered » 12:18 am

Boreades wrote: Was this done in Egypt as well?

The Egyptians didn't go in for reshaping their skulls but elongated heads seem to have had an aesthetic value

Image

Egyptologists call this headgear the 'white crown', similar but even more impressive is the double crown usually worn by Horus, though as Wiki points out no-one has yet discovered an actual crown even in the unrobbed Tutankhamen tomb

Egyptologist Bob Brier has noted that despite its widespread depiction in royal portraits, no ancient Egyptian crown ever has been discovered. Tutankhamun's tomb, discovered largely intact, did contain such regalia as his crook and flail, but no crown was found however among the funerary equipment.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby Penny » 2:17 pm

Binding skulls isn't necessarily connected to tall headgear but looking at Egyptian 'crowns' I can't help but think of shamanic headdresses. Particularly the so-called double crown. Shamans would add height by wearing antlers. Siberian rock art is pretty basic and makes them look like rays.

Perhaps an explanation is due for the apparent connections between two cultures which on the surface are about as distant as they could possibly be.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby hvered » 9:05 pm

Shamanic headdresses aren't antlered. The ceremonial outfit resembles a bear more than a deer, a very potent symbol.

Come to think of it, our own guardsmen wear bearskins which were graded so that every man's height would be identical. Not sure if this is still the case.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby hvered » 8:01 pm

Penny wrote: Binding skulls isn't necessarily connected to tall headgear but looking at Egyptian 'crowns' I can't help but think of shamanic headdresses.

This may have a bearing on witches' hats. No-one knows where or when tall pointy hats originated though they're as emblematic as ever. Such is the attachment to tradition. Perhaps.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby macausland » 8:44 pm

Several websites claim that the Egyptians did go in for skull deformation. Although many of these sites start talking about ancient astronauts and the Annanuki etc.

Here's a more academic, if I may mention that word here, site.

http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/nparr/ind ... age398.htm
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby hvered » 5:02 am

Thanks for the link, Elongated skulls confer extra height, suggestive of a literally higher authority. The most famous depiction of an Egyptian sausage-head is Queen Nefertiti's receiving the son's rays which is rather reminiscent of shamanic 'connectedness' between sky and earth. There is a striking resemblance to bishops' mitres and of course the papal headdress.

Image

Bishop Challoner's silver mitre above has been likened to a coal scuttle. To me it looks like a pair of ears, not dissimilar to hares' ears, or a pair of wings which recalls Hermes and his winged helmet (cf. oracles/'talking heads'). We still refer to something special as being earmarked, supposedly from the practice of marking the ears of domestic cattle. Hermes was the god of flocks and herds.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby macausland » 9:04 am

The Bishop's mitre certainly looks similar to the ancient Egyptian priests' hats, perhaps a continuous tradition?

Witches' pointy hats may be connected in some way with the Ku Klux Klan type outfits the Spanish Inquisition used to wear. Officials of whatever standing seem to have always worn outlandish outfits to mark them out from the common herd.

More practically perhaps were the 'birdman' outfits worn by plague doctors in the middle ages. No ears on these, but then if they are birds they wouldn't want ears.

http://scienceblogs.com/retrospectacle/ ... ts-antipl/

Clothes maketh the man as they say.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby hvered » 11:38 am

The point, no pun intended, about witches is they didn't want to mark themselves out. According to legal records the accused were ordinary women dressed plainly. Pointed headgear in medieval Europe was fashionable and presumably not considered remotely witch-like though to modern viewers they may have slightly sinister connotations.

Image

This could be why film-makers, meticulous when it comes to historical wardrobes, get the hats wrong. Except for 'bad queens'.

Re the Spanish Inquisition, inquisitors would be dressed in clerical garb being Dominicans mainly. Anti-Catholic propaganda perhaps?

The birdman doctor is fascinating, the headgear is almost like a gas-mask. Interesting that his ankles are his Achilles' heel.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby macausland » 12:08 pm

It would appear that pointy hats were quite common in many parts of the world including Japan. Although the one we usually think of is the 'dunce's' hat given to schoolchildren to wear.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pointed_hat

As regards the lady's pointy hat apparently they weren't well received by the devout, in France at least, where they were ridiculed by certain people.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hennin

According to this website the witch's pointy hat is a relatively recent development from the eighteenth century although the article does refer to other possibilities.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/2013 ... esign.html

From what I remember reading about 'witches' in England they were usually victims of local feuds and the attentions of landgrabbers (property developers in modern parlance).

Although witches could also be male it seems that women were the usual victims. Often old and widowed. What didn't help them was the fact that they were often knowledgeable regarding herbal remedies and in an age where all knowledge was in the teachings of the 'godly' anything to do with curing illness through plants and natural concoctions rather than through prayer would be suspect.

It's interesting to note that even in modern medicine there is a difference in medical titles. Doctors in the past were educated hence the 'doctor' bit. Messy surgery and tooth pulling was left to barbers. Hence the doctor in his or her surgery who talks to a computer for three minutes before printing a prescription out and the Mr or Miss in the Dentist's surgery or hospital operating theatre.
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Re: Walkie Talkies

Postby spiral » 4:24 pm

Hunting tricks.......

Camouflage..Antiflage.
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