Off your head.

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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 12:21 pm

Chad wrote: I put up a link to this over on the AEL site a while ago (and I'm sure Wiley has known about it for even longer).

Have you managed to access the other 13 "hidden" chapters?

Some great stuff in there.

Thanks for that, Chad, for some reason I don't get notified of AEL posts so often miss them. Maybe Wiley's earlier posts on hunting 'softened' the ground, anyway I'm lapping it up now. The only snag for me, being a non-Gaelic speaker, is not knowing how the words sound but I marvel at the connections, old and new.

Your tip was very helpful, I can access the other chapters. Haven't got far yet, reading on a screen seems easier in short stages.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby macausland » 9:14 am

hvered

There is an excellent dictionary online, Dwelly's dictionary which is often called the Gaelic bible.

The people who have put it online have also produced a 'small dictionary' on the same site. Look for the link at the top.

Instructions are in Gaelic or English depending on preference. The smaller dictionary also brings up translations from Dwelly in a separate column. The smaller dictionary is based on modern vocabulary and usage. Some of the words have an audio symbol next to them which gives the pronunciation when clicked.

http://www.dwelly.info/

Hope this helps. Even without the pronunciation it is very useful for checking the words contained in the lochearnhead site.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Mick Harper » 11:56 am

I put up a link to this over on the AEL site a while ago (and I'm sure Wiley has known about it for even longer).


I can find no sign of this, Chad. It is important that those on the AEL who don't use this forum (Ishmael? Wiley?) get involved.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby spiral » 3:16 pm

hvered wrote:
spiral wrote: You will note she was beheaded.

In the best Celtic saints' tradition, Winifred's head became a spring and she was then made whole as, apparently, were all those who bathed in it.

The spring which burst forth on the spot where her head rested is still flowing, and its stones are annually spotted with blood in commemoration of the miracle. Ever since it has been believed to have virtues like those of the Pool of Bethesda, and great multitudes of sick folic, blind, halt and withered step into it to be made whole of their diseases.

The location of Holywell on the southern bank of the Dee estuary on the west coast would be perfectly suited for a beacon I'd have thought.


Another who fits the pattern is http://www.celticsaints.org/2011/0323a.html St Gwinear another beheading this time after an attempt to throw the saint in a fetid pool.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Chad » 3:40 pm

Mick Harper wrote:
I put up a link to this over on the AEL site a while ago (and I'm sure Wiley has known about it for even longer).


I can find no sign of this, Chad. It is important that those on the AEL who don't use this forum (Ishmael? Wiley?) get involved.


It's on page 13 of Scotching the Scotch : from the east or from the west?

In fact it's still the last post on that thread... (It was posted just after Boreades joined.)

I was most surprised that nobody seemed interested at the time.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Chad » 3:55 pm

This was it:
Gaelic's arrival and expansion in the various different regions of Scotland in the Middle Ages, examining in particular a number of different nodes of controversy, where paradigms have been shifting over recent years, including the advent of Gaelic in northern Britain; the dominance of G aelic in the kingdom of Alba; and Gaelic in the south-west, the Western Isles, and the far north. What will emerge is a much more complex, nuanced series of interlocking episodes in Scotland's linguistic history.


An archaic dialect of Gaelic was spoken in remote parts of Scotland up until a couple of hundred years ago… (I think as far east as Perthshire)… which is said to be little changed since the Palaeolithic.

Its vocabulary is centred mainly on hunting terms (and other basic communication necessities) and very similar words in the modern western Gaelic dialects have acquired meanings more appropriate to a post hunting culture, but with fairly obvious connection to the archaic.

This would suggest Gaelic was the original language of Scotland, rather than an Irish import.

(Wiley knows much more about this stuff than I do.)

http://lochearnhead.wikidot.com/archaic-gaelic

Well worth looking at.


I'm sure Wiley found the site long before I did... and that is where much of his inspiration comes from.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Chad » 4:33 pm

Boreades wrote:Just out of curiosity, who is Alexander Aberfeldy?


I think she is actually called Sheila McGregor.

I have even more for you (another book):

This is the initial volume in the series Decoding the Past


http://aberfeldy.wikidot.com

This is small excerpt from the first chapter:

Watson’s archaeological evidence has crumbled. He believed that the circular forts of northern Perthshire were Irish military installations, but excavation suggests they were domestic cattle pens.


Mick, I think you will like this.
Last edited by Chad on 2:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Chad » 7:13 pm

I think I might have found Sheila's gaff.

http://lesberreries.wikidot.com/
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Re: Off your head.

Postby macausland » 1:19 pm

I think this may be an article by the same Sheila MacGregor.

It is a history of the MacGregors and mentions them as part of the 'aboriginal' population of Scotland.

Donated to the 'National Library of Scotland on behalf of the Clan Gregor centre'.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=ca ... yDt2uO2cXQ
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Jools » 4:39 pm

Chad wrote:An archaic dialect of Gaelic was spoken in remote parts of Scotland up until a couple of hundred years ago… (I think as far east as Perthshire)… which is said to be little changed since the Palaeolithic.

Its vocabulary is centred mainly on hunting terms (and other basic communication necessities) and very similar words in the modern western Gaelic dialects have acquired meanings more appropriate to a post hunting culture, but with fairly obvious connection to the archaic.


The association of hunting with the nobility, which Sheila Macgregor notes, is interesting as an 'archaic' lifestyle (and terminology?) would perhaps not have survived.

In any case it may be relevant that Celtic saints were also from noble families. Choosing the life of a hermit, an act of apparent self-sacrifice and humility, could even have been a step up archaically speaking. [The NT makes great use of fishing metaphors though vast shoals of fish are usually found in northern seas aren't they?]
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