Off your head.

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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 3:00 pm

The Jewish equivalent of Easter, Pesach, is said to mean 'limp, stagger' or 'perform a hobbling dance'.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby macausland » 5:04 pm

Boreades: Limping blacksmiths

Have you come across this site which goes on at some length about the dangers blacksmiths faced regarding poisoning and its effects?

http://forumro.org/2013/02/the-history- ... edol-dove/
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 11:07 pm

macausland wrote:Boreades: Limping blacksmiths

Have you come across this site which goes on at some length about the dangers blacksmiths faced regarding poisoning and its effects?

http://forumro.org/2013/02/the-history- ... edol-dove/


I've not seen it before, but that is interesting. I'm wondering how widespread this effect was, and how much it shapes our folklore. e.g. dwarf miners.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 9:00 pm

Getting back to food and drink, I was forced (by social obligations) to visit our local pub a few days ago, and check the quality of the beer brewed with our chalkland water supplies.

Talking to Martin, a local farmer with a keen thirst, and a keen interest in local history, I learnt that the Rivers Og and Kennet used to have a lot of watercress beds. This was no frivolous designer food being grown for Waitrose and posh grub places in London, it was a serious part of people's daily diet. Known since Roman times at least.

Springs would be capped to control the water flow, and the best watercress would be the stuff grown nearest the spring water. Grow it any further downstream and it too easily gets contaminated with Flukeworm from cattle. Which would not improve your culinary or digestive experience.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby spiral » 8:01 am

Images of the Green man are common in cathedrals and on pub signs. A common explanation for their appearance in cathedrals, is that the pagan artisans decided to add in a few (on the side) whilst taking a break from their christian labours......which given the number (often more than the image of Jesus) suggests the supervision of artisans must have been a tad lax.

No one yet seems able to confront the idea that these might have been intentional Green Heads (green beheadings)......
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Rocky » 7:28 pm

Boreades wrote:As you say - Archaeologists can't tell from bones - but DNA profiling can (hence we know the Saxons were never more than 10% of population at most,)

This isn't always the case judging by a recent archaeology programme on Yorkshire's chariot burials in which the very eminent archaeologist said the burials are unique to Britain though they have a counterpart in the area around Paris. From the high-tech DNA profiling it was clear these were native to east Yorkshire (which is probably why he omitted to say they were known as Parisii).


"Rather dangerous to mess with the natives' burial rites. " - agreed - but what we're talking about is Romans who imposed strange burial rites.

Why would the Romans know or care about British burial practices? Leave well alone so long as they pay their taxes, etc. etc. Maybe the strange rites were British, not Roman?
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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 7:48 pm

spiral wrote:Images of the Green man are common in cathedrals and on pub signs. A common explanation for their appearance in cathedrals, is that the pagan artisans decided to add in a few (on the side) whilst taking a break from their christian labours......which given the number (often more than the image of Jesus) suggests the supervision of artisans must have been a tad lax.

No one yet seems able to confront the idea that these might have been intentional Green Heads (green beheadings)......

Are green men churches peculiar to the UK?

French stonemasons were the elite we're told, maybe local pride was responsible for the green heads, not all of which are particularly artistic it has to be said. (It's anachronistic to see England as a united kingdom at this time I know but presumably warring against the French was quite unifying)
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 11:04 pm

Rocky wrote:
Boreades wrote:As you say - Archaeologists can't tell from bones - but DNA profiling can (hence we know the Saxons were never more than 10% of population at most,)

This isn't always the case judging by a recent archaeology programme on Yorkshire's chariot burials in which the very eminent archaeologist said the burials are unique to Britain though they have a counterpart in the area around Paris. From the high-tech DNA profiling it was clear these were native to east Yorkshire (which is probably why he omitted to say they were known as Parisii).


Of course when we're talking chariot burials, we mean the La Tène culture, and not just "Paris"

I recall being in Hull 20+ years ago when Camponile (the French hotel people) opened its first hotel in East Yorkshire. The Yorkshire Parisii references were known and understood by them. The references were less well understood by the reporter from the local paper who reported it as somehow casting a slight on Yorkshire uniqueness.

I'm attracted to the idea that the Parisi were late incomers, fleeing from Julius Caesar's conquests, along with the Veneti and Belgae refugees that escaped from the mainland. The most likely route by sea, using the prevailing winds, was up the east coast, looking for a safe refuge.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 11:20 pm

Sorry, bad manners, I forgot to mention a link to a modern version of the ref:
http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingLists ... Parisi.htm
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Re: Off your head.

Postby spiral » 6:49 am

Boreades wrote:
I'm attracted to the idea that the Parisi were late incomers, fleeing from Julius Caesar's conquests, along with the Veneti and Belgae refugees that escaped from the mainland. The most likely route by sea, using the prevailing winds, was up the east coast, looking for a safe refuge.


You can't throw off your classicist upbringing.

The Parisii, of course, migrated from Yorkshire to Paris.

As the Japanese say "The reverse also has a reverse".....
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