Off your head.

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Re: Off your head.

Postby macausland » 6:29 pm

Regarding the Michael Line etc has anyone come across this site which tries to link it up with other sites in the world.

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthr ... 8c855c6329

Apologies if it's old news.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 10:05 pm

macausland wrote:Regarding the Michael Line etc has anyone come across this site which tries to link it up with other sites in the world.

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthr ... 8c855c6329

Apologies if it's old news.

It's good to have our memory jogged. :-)
They have some good articles there.
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/forumdi ... Archeology
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Mick Harper » 12:51 am

Interesting but a mite underwhelming. One thing though. He talked very matter of factly about Glastonbury Tor being artificial. I thought this was one of mine. I did google it without finding anybody else saying it but if it's old hat ... I mean as being built from the ground up, not just shaped.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 10:08 pm

Mick Harper wrote:Interesting but a mite underwhelming. One thing though. He talked very matter of factly about Glastonbury Tor being artificial. I thought this was one of mine. I did google it without finding anybody else saying it but if it's old hat ... I mean as being built from the ground up, not just shaped.


Google searches may vary
e.g.
Glastonbury: http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/englandglastonbury.htm
as a shaped hill
But Burrowbridge : http://www.numberscience.plus.com/AW10.html
as a man-made hill

at least, the latter may well be true, and ought to displace Silbury Hill's claim to fame as the largest man-made pimple. Not that English Heritage care, but that's another rant for another day.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 8:57 am

Boreades wrote: Google searches may vary
e.g.
Glastonbury: http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/englandglastonbury.htm
as a shaped hill
But Burrowbridge : http://www.numberscience.plus.com/AW10.html
as a man-made hill

at least, the latter may well be true, and ought to displace Silbury Hill's claim to fame as the largest man-made pimple. Not that English Heritage care, but that's another rant for another day.

It's interesting that people seem to accept that cone-shaped hills are artificial not just on the Michael Line, viz:

If and when Burrow Mump is proved to be wholly artificial then Silbury will lose its position as the largest man-made mound in Europe. And if Cley Hill is also artificial then both of them pale into insignificance compared to it. However in an area where any hills are at a premium the Mump is a very unnatural feature and so is another most famous hill that is visible some ten miles to the northeast.


Cley Hill has the same layout as Silbury, the road to Warminster makes a wide and very noticeable curve to go round it before continuing south-east to Old Sarum, another artificial mound. The siting of such striking and intervisible hills beside long-distance routes seems the equivalent of island-hopping at sea.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 8:24 pm

hvered wrote:The siting of such striking and intervisible hills beside long-distance routes seems the equivalent of island-hopping at sea.


I'm more and more certain we should be measuring the distances between these isolated hills in the same way as folks are mapping Roman Marching Camps, on the basis that there must be a camp or fort at the end of every day's travel. As for Roman military logistics, so for Megalithic trade routes.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Mick Harper » 10:10 pm

Why would a traveller want to climb up a hill at the end of a long day?
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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 8:22 am

Etymonline says

clay
Old English clæg "stiff, sticky earth; clay," from West Germanic *klaijaz (cf. Old High German kliwa "bran," German Kleie, Old Frisian klai "clay," Old Saxon klei, Middle Dutch clei, Danish klæg "clay;" also Old English clæman, Old Norse kleima, Old High German kleiman "to cover with clay"), from PIE root *glei- "clay" (cf. Greek gloios "sticky matter;" Latin gluten "glue;" Old Church Slavonic glina "clay," glenu "slime, mucus;" Old Irish glenim "I cleave, adhere").

in Scripture, the stuff from which the body of the first man was formed; hence "human body" (especially when dead). Clay pigeon is from 1888. Feet of clay "fundamental weakness" is from Dan. ii:33.


The ideal material to fashion a form or body, it seems Cley Hill was the work of the Devil rather than the good Lord according to legend.

It may be that cley or claeg is related to clue, the modern spelling of clew (q.v.) meaning yarn or thread used specifically to guide a traveller.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby Boreades » 8:58 pm

Mick Harper wrote:Why would a traveller want to climb up a hill at the end of a long day?


All the better to see where the next hill is.
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Re: Off your head.

Postby hvered » 9:51 am

Round here the soil is clayey and when wet very heavy, so not surprising that glue and clay are the same word and it would surely be seen as a useful material for causeway-builders etc. except that dry clay cracks and crumbles.

If some kind of 'glue' was necessary to maintain a structure, a tidal causeway may have been a compromise to prevent it from drying out but not so soft as to be washed away.
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