Gypsies, tramps and thieves

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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby Boreades » 6:39 pm

Yesterday here in Britain, we were getting the results of a different kind of "beating the bounds". Beating the bounders?

The UK's political boundaries are being redrawn wholesale. The new distribution looks, however, vaguely familiar. Like tribal boundaries or DNA-distribution maps, with a western-fringe.

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Viewers in the US of A might find something else familiar about this as well.

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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby Mick Harper » 8:40 pm

In TME we were constantly trying to link gypsies with the Megalithics. There was a some circumstantial overlap but this is the first bit of direct, sort of, evidence. From a Guardian essay:

One Easter in the mid-1960s, I travelled south with a friend to the Camargue and the great festival of nomads at Saintes Maries de la Mer. Thousands of Gypsies had gathered from every corner of Europe for the annual celebration of the miraculous landing on the shore near the little town of the three Saint Marys on their storm-tossed voyage from the Holy Land.


http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/m ... to-the-sun
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby Boreades » 10:00 pm

Yawn.
Until you tell us why three Saint Marys (not just one or two)
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby TisILeclerc » 8:07 am

'Until you tell us why three Saint Marys (not just one or two)'

Marys always come in threes. As in 'Last Night there were Three Marys' a dirge popular in the sixties.

Tony Robinson mentions these three in a video on youtube. Turns out it's a different three Marys to the one popularised by Dan Brown. The programme is about debunking the Da Vinci Code. So if anybody doesn't want to be disappointed it's not for them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAtoP5nFhh4

As you are interested in boats, borry, there's another one you may have missed regarding the old boat found at Dover.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4OylAKusMw
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby Mick Harper » 4:10 pm

In TME we pointed out that gypsies and other similar travellers were mimicking The Megalithics in various ways eg nomadic long distance travelling, metalbashing, very horsey, clannish, being outside normal society etc etc. We could only speculate that the Gypsies were actual latterday Megalithics stranded by the advances of normal society because we could never make any actual connection.

The legendary arrival of Mary Magdalen in Europe is (in TME anyway) taken as a Megalithic event. We do not say this happened, only that it was taken up for various purposes by the Megalithics. So for gypsies to choose this very spot for a big jamboree is either coincidental or significant.
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby hvered » 10:15 am

Appleby in Cumbria hosts the largest gathering of gypsies, Roma, Travellers & co., so large that it was featured on Newsnight. The site on the northern edge of Appleby is called Fair Hill, a Gallows Hill though without a gibbet. The hill is 187 metres according to Google Earth, the same as Silbury Hill, and like Silbury is on a long-distance route that goes north-west to Carlisle.

This noticeably straight route bisects another Fair Hill at Penrith, also on the northern edge of the town. Again according to Google Earth, the elevation is 192 metres but on the OS map 182 is marked, thirty-three feet lower. Such places are both marginal and in full view, not apparently remarked on unless used for hangings or whatever.
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby hvered » 10:27 am

Another link between Appleby, Penrith and Carlisle are the medieval friars. The ever-reliable Victoria County History says that within fifty years four orders established themselves, the Dominicans and Franciscans in Carlisle, the Austin Friars in Penrith and the Carmelites in Appleby. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/cu ... /pp194-199

I'm not sure if this fits here but will park it for the time being because sociologically there may be some similarities in attitudes to gypsy travellers and mendicant friars. Mendicant refers to begging, perhaps not far removed from mendacious. Either way, the friars rather than 'proper' clergy seem to have been called upon as negotiators and also to help at the end of people's lives. Both functions, carried out by 'friars eremites', are of course associated with Hermes.
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby Boreades » 11:04 pm

Re the Three Marys revered by the gypsies.

In the Trade Secrets topic, we discussed the Egyptian Mari tradition. Some high priestess of Egypt from Miriam (Mery Amon) onwards have names like Mary, even while in exile, through to Mary Magdalan.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1908&hilit=aaron&start=450

This may have slipped into European tradition via the Greek Moirai, traditionally numbered as a trio of wise women.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moirai

Are these the same as the Mouras Encantadas in Portugal and Galicia? These have strong megalithic connections.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enchanted_Moura
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Re: Gypsies, tramps and thieves

Postby TisILeclerc » 1:21 pm

Travellers, Tinkers and allied trades always claim to have special knowledge gained from their ancestors.

The lore of trade, horses, metals and so on. Often passed down in stories and song.

Is Siberia connected to this network? Mongolia is definitely horsey.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeAp1fPt8Eg

A young lady from Siberia has recently appeared on television playing the Jews' Harp while dressed as a 'shaman'. She is a professional musician but presumably her knowledge of her own tradition is of interest. As tradition and as music. Did the shamans become involved to the same extent as this person in their own copying of the mind of the wild animals around them?

– You’re playing on one of the most ancient music instruments. What should we know about its history and use?

– My teacher told me that in ancient times the jaw harp was played by wizards and shamans and that the Jew’s harp can heal people, make a person better and stronger. For me it was like a fairy tale. I really wanted to touch this magical world and I worked very hard at playing the jaw harp. After I read a lot of books about this ancient instrument and learned that almost all nations on Earth have an instrument like this. Then I realized that khomus is the key to all hearts, it is a symbol of friendship and the unity of people, it’s the music that carries the memory of ancestors. The harp holds a lot of mysteries that we cannot understand but can feel on a subconscious level when we play or listen to these sounds. People react differently, someone cries, someone laughs, but all of them are so grateful for the vivid memories and new deep sensations. Everyone has their secrets.

– Please tell Ozorians something about the Sakha Republic you are from and the Yakuts traditions. Do you carry the Shamanic roots of your motherland?

– Playing the khomus is an ancient tradition of the people of Sakha (Yakutia). They always played the jaw harp — on holidays, at rituals, alone and together. With the sounds of jaw harp they restored the balance within ourselves and with nature, communicating with the spirits of nature – fire, wind, water and others. My mother told me that in our family there were women-healers. Now maybe the jaw harp helps me open up my gift and create a connection with the ancestors, their wisdom and knowledge.


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https://ozorianprophet.eu/music/we-will ... aya-uutai/
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