Navigations and directions

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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 12:05 pm

What I've noticed (besides the pretty patterns) is that one triplet is usually joined to a neighbouring triplet in a specific way.

Image

Start with one triplet:

X---X---X

The second triplet starts from the centre of the first triplet.


X---X---X
..... |
..... X
..... |
..... X

The third triplet starts from the centre of the second triplet.

X---X---X
..... |
..... X---X---X
..... |
..... X

(sorry about the dots, trying to make a simple schematic)
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 12:13 pm

The kind of questions that surface are:

- Do these T shapes mean anything?
- Why would you choose that kind of relationship?
- In ancient history, was the letter T symbolic of anything special?
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Mick Harper » 12:44 pm

You will have to establish the reality of this pattern first. I mean''reality' of course (we can argue that later). It is certainly not obvious from your maps what it is you are claiming. Perhaps you might give us three maps:
a) choose a triplet
b) identify the centre point
c) draw the next triplet based on that point.
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 12:56 pm

As these shapes pre-date the arrival of Latin in Britain, if we want to look at any alphabets, we need to look at Greek or Phoenician.

We're told here that the Greek alphabet was based on the Phoenician alphabet.

The Greek letter Tau was based on the Phoenician letter Taw (X). Apparently X means a mark. Or X marks the spot?

I think TME has already had posts on the Celtic Cross as a boundary marker and/or navigation tool.

At this point, I have a few problems.

If we take it literally, Tau sounds very like Tor, and many of these hill tops (in Devon and Cornwall) are called Tors. Dartmoor especially is covered in them, which could get me excited. But would I be confusing the pattern with the parts of the pattern?

There are no Tor hilltops in Dorset, because a Tor is just supposed to be a hill with naturally occurring rocks on the top. But what does a Tor get called after humans have taken all the rocks and rearranged them in a ring on top of the hill to make an enclosure?

I'm not sure why Glastonbury Tor is called a Tor.
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 5:56 pm

Let's try a worked example, starting at the hill at The Centre Of The ME Universe.

1) Draw a line south through the first major hilltop enclosure.

Image
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 5:57 pm

2) Does it get anywhere interesting?

Yes it does. Casterley Camp.

Image
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 5:59 pm

3) Are there any major hilltop enclosures to the left or right that might possibly form some kind of a T-shape?

Yes there are, Knook Castle and Milton Hill.

Image
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 6:03 pm

4) How good is the alignment of these candidates with the first triplet?

Pretty good!

Image
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 9:35 pm

Origins

As part of establishing any historical basis for these alignments (if real), sooner or later we have to ask who could have made them, and why? The hill forts and enclosures date from The Late Bronze Age and The Iron Age, up to c.100BC. In terms of cultures and peoples, this implies Celts and Britons. There are pitifully few examples of Celtic or British writing from the period, let alone historical accounts. Which led many historians to assume that Celts and Britons were uncivilised and illiterate. Not true, as several Roman historical records convey their astonishment at the sophisticated technology of the Celts, some of whom spoke to the Romans in Greek!

Were there Celtic historical records elsewhere that offer us any help? Possibly there are, in Ireland. The Book Of Invasions is a compilation of legends, written in the 11th Century.

For the following, I thank Graham Robb’s Ancient Paths.
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Re: Navigations and directions

Postby Boreades » 9:56 pm

The Hill of Uisneach, is the centre of Ireland and it marked the meeting point of the borders of the ancient regions or Kingdoms of Leinster, Munster, Connacht, Ulster and Meath. In legend, Uisneach was chosen by the Druids as the centre point from wihch they surveyed the whole of Ireland.

Surveying suggest some kind of measurement along aligned paths. Is there any hint of where these paths would have led to?

Yes, spiritually-significant historic centres in each of the four historic regions

Ráth Cruachan - the traditional capital of the Connachta (the Connacht region)

Cnoc Áine - historically important site in Limerick and Munster

Dún Ailinne - another of the great Royal Sites of Ireland

and Emaın Macha

Image
Last edited by Boreades on 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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