Drink!

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Re: Drink!

Postby Boreades » 5:27 pm

Oh by the way, the Yanks like to think they are "unique" as well.

Fishing Limestone Streams: A Complete Guide to Fishing These Unique Waters

Limestone streams present some of the most intriguing and challenging fly-fishing waters in mid-America, flowing through such storied fishing regions in Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and New York. Meck explains what limestone streams are, how they significantly differ from freestone streams, and why they are such an important part of the environment


Here's a nice article by a fly fishing expert on the effect of the geology.

Rich and Poor Trout Streams
by Tom Rosenbauer
Geology determines the entire character of a trout stream. A glance at the surrounding terrain can tell you how big the trout will grow, how much food is available to them, and how they will be distributed in the stream; it also helps you predict their feeding behavior and even what flies will work.
http://midcurrent.com/techniques/rich-a ... t-streams/
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Re: Drink!

Postby TisILeclerc » 5:47 pm

This may be a bit off key but all this talk about wine and chalk has reminded me that French vineyards put lumps of limestone inbetween the vines. It keeps the weeks down, provides minerals no doubt and absorbs daytime heat which it releases slowly during the night like a storage heater a bit.
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Re: Drink!

Postby Boreades » 5:48 pm

Are you Kimmeridgian?

A basin of limestone marl that starts in England runs all the way down through the vineyards of Champagne, the Loire Valley and ultimately Burgundy. It is on this ridge, known as the Kimmeridgian, that the best vineyards lie. The soil varies from hill to hill, but all contain at least some of this limestone clay which is heavy with nutrients from the fossils of shellfish from eons ago.

Image

http://mowse.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/con ... soils.html
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Re: Drink!

Postby TisILeclerc » 5:48 pm

This may be a bit off key but all this talk about wine and chalk has reminded me that French vineyards put lumps of limestone inbetween the vines. It keeps the weeks down, provides minerals no doubt and absorbs daytime heat which it releases slowly during the night like a storage heater a bit.
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Re: Drink!

Postby Boreades » 5:51 pm

All this talk of fish & wine is making me hungry & thirsty. I'm off for some fish & chips.

Edit: M'lady has given me a South African Sauvignon Blanc to wash it down with. Now I'll have to check the geology of South Africa and the Western Cape as well.
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Re: Drink!

Postby TisILeclerc » 9:27 am

Has anyone mentioned the holy connection with water, booze and other things yet?

As well as looking after tidal islands, high places and the like the good old monks were always good for a tipple. And still are.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/0/18786736

Belgium is famous for its holy beers and other places get into wines of various kinds.

Did monasteries have a monopoly on everything? It looks like they were really running an alternative society within society. They had their own laws which protected themselves to some extent from the king's law and appear to have been an early example of an industrial monopoly as well as the holy bits.

As with any large community, from farms to palaces, brewing was a regular activity in religious settlements, alongside baking, laundry, cooking and all the other essential household activities. At the 11th century abbey at Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk, for example, there were 75 “bakers, brewers, tailors, washers, shoemakers, robemakers, cooks, porters and bursars” to serve the abbot and the 30 priests, deacons and clerics, 28 nuns and unnumbered “poor persons”


http://zythophile.co.uk/false-ale-quote ... operation/

How would society have survived without the monasteries and other orders? The king certainly wouldn't have got involved and the 'barons' would only have been interested in huntin' shootin' and fishin' as they still are today. The Gentry don't do trade and looking at our present political leaders never will. They don't understand it.

But the monks did.
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Re: Drink!

Postby Boreades » 10:46 pm

TisILeclerc wrote: Did monasteries have a monopoly on everything? It looks like they were really running an alternative society within society. They had their own laws which protected themselves to some extent from the king's law and appear to have been an early example of an industrial monopoly as well as the holy bits..


Some might say the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is more of the same old International Free Trade, unfettered by pesky local Kings and their laws. The monasteries (and their international connections) are an excellent example of "business as usual" that cuts across national barriers.
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Re: Drink!

Postby Mick Harper » 10:47 pm

Not clear whether you are saying this is a good thing or a bad thing.
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Re: Drink!

Postby TisILeclerc » 7:54 am

Church and Crown were in a symbiotic relationship.

The church pacified the plebs and kept them in their place with threats of eternal damnation as well as the carrot bits by providing a social and economic structure to keep local economies going within the larger economy. In the north of England the monasteries were quite beneficial for the locals which is why there was a hoo haa at the time of Henry's dissolution.

Farmers from Cumbria could bring cattle down to Yorkshire and leave them at various monasteries where they would be fed and looked after for when farmers from further south came up to buy. The monasteries took the money on behalf of the Cumbrians and passed it on when they returned for it. They also provided alms houses, built bridges and schools for the poor. All of this was something the king was not interested in.

Before Henry of course the crown could provide real protection for the country and the church. As long as both sides knew their limits everything was all right.

As for Tip or whatever it is that's just the Yanks trying to be dashing imperialists like the British empire of old. But quite frankly they just haven't got the class, what! No give and take with them, just take.
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Re: Drink!

Postby Boreades » 11:11 am

Mick Harper wrote: Not clear whether you are saying this is a good thing or a bad thing.


I'm not clear in my own mind whether it is a good thing or a bad thing. So I will boldy go down the middle and sit on the fence.

But there is a noteworthy similarity. Especially as some of the monastery charters (whether fake or not) appear to have given the monasteries special tax status as well as title to large chunks of land. A bit like the Offshore Tax Havens that were in the news for a while. Places where the international businesses and seriously wealthy can park their wealth without being taxed at local rates. Except that the monasteries would be Onshore Tax Havens.

Perhaps with Duty-Free Drink as well?
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